The Egloshayle Ringers

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Egloshayle Ringers (Roud 1163[1]) was collected by The Revd Sabine Baring-Gould from John Martyn, shoemaker, of Milton Abbott, who learnt it from his wife's uncle, who died in 1868 and was a ringer of St Kew. The ringers mentioned in the song now lie in the graveyard at Egloshayle, where their headstones can be found: Humphry Craddock d. 1839; John Ellery d. 1859, aged 85; Thomas Cleave d. 1821, aged 78; John Pollard d. 1825, aged 71; John Goodfellow d. 1846, aged 80.

Version 1[2]

Come all you ringers good and grave, come listen to my peal,
I'll tell you of five ringers brave that lived in Egloshayle.
They bear the sway in any array where'er they chance to go,
Good music of melodious bells 'tis their delight to show.

The foreman gives the sig-na-al, he steps along with the toe,
He casts his eye about them all and gives the sign to go.
Away they pull, with courage full, the heart it do revive
To hear them swing and music bring, one, two, three, four and five.

There's Craddock the cordwainer first, that rings the treble bell,
The second is John Ellery, and none may him excel.
The third is Pollard, carpenter, the fourth is Thomas Cleeve.
Goodfellow is the tenor man that rings them round so brave.

They went up to Lanlivery, they brought away the prize,
And then they went to San Tudy and there they did likewise.
There's Stratton men, St. Mabyn men, St. Issey and St. Kew,
But the five lads of Egloshayle can all the rest out-do.

Now to conclude my merry task, the sovereign's health we join.
Stand every man, I pass the flask and drink his health in wine.
And here's to Craddock, Ellery, and here's to Thomas Cleave,
To Pollard and the tenor man that rings them round so brave.

Version 2[2]

Come all you jolly ringers and listen to my tale,
I'll tell you of five ringers bold that lived in Egloshayle.
By ring or ray, by night and day, none with them could compare
The fame of these five ringers bold was a true delight to hear.

Chorus (after each verse):
Lanlivery men, St. Tudy men, St. Mabyn and St. Kew,
But these five boys from Egloshayle could all the rest out-do.

There was Craddock the cordwainer, he rang the treble bell.
John Ellery was the second man and few could him excel.
The third was Pollard the carpenter, the fourth was Thomas Cleeve,
And Goodfellow the tenor man he rang them round so brave.

Now Craddock was the captain, he stepped along with his toe
And casting of his eye about he commanded them where to go.
They rang so brave with courage bold; it did their hearts revive
Sweet music then was quickly heard with a one, two, three, four, five.

They went down to Lanlivery and took away the prize,
They went up to St. Tudy and they've done the same likewise.
There's Stratton men, St. Mabyn men, St. Issey and St. Kew,
But these five boys from Egloshayle could all the rest out-do.

With this little core they ran so sure, no changes did they fear,
No man did ever lose his turn, 'twas a joy to see and hear.
And people all for miles around did tell o'er hill and vale
The tale of these five ringers bold that lived in Egloshayle.

Now to conclude this merry tale, the ringers' health I'll join.
Stand every man and pass the flask and drink their health in wine.
So here's to Craddock, Ellery, and here's to Thomas Cleeve,
To Pollard and to Goodfellow who rang them round so brave.

External links

References

  1. Vaughan Williams Memorial Library - Roud 1163
  2. 2.0 2.1 Mainly Norfolk - The Egloshayle Ringers